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New Brunswick Bird Records Committee

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Birds of New Brunswick: An Annotated List

Birds of New Brunswick: An Annotated List was published in 2004 by the NB Museum and lists all bird species confirmed in the province up to that time – some 406 species. It describes their status (resident, migrant, visitor, etc.), relative abundance and frequency of occurrence as well as information on their geographical distribution in New Brunswick and their seasonal appearance. Nature NB, in collaboration with the NB Bird Records Committee* and the NB Museum, is making this list available at a very low cost to persons interested in the birds of New Brunswick.

This is an opportunity for people at every level of interest to own the most detailed source of information on New Brunswick birds. If you would like to purchase a copy ($5 per book), contact your local Naturalists’ club or contact Nature NB.

Since 2004, a number of new bird species have been documented in New Brunswick. The official bird list now stands at nearly 420 species, with some other potential “firsts” awaiting review by the Bird Records Committee. These recent additions and information about each are available in the addendum below, which will enable birders to keep their copy of the book up to date in future.

Birds of New Brunswick: An Annotated List

Birds of New Brunswick: Addendum

Print/View Addendum

Since publication of Birds of New Brunswick: An Annotated List in 2004, the New Brunswick Bird Records Committee has accepted 33 additional species, mostly accidental visitors to the province. It also removed one species, considered an erroneous record. The NB Bird List includes 438 species as of August 11, 2023:

Addendum contents (Click to view information)
  1. Graylag Goose: Anser anser (Oie cendrée)
  2. Pink-footed Goose: Anser brachyrhynchus (Oie à bec court)
  3. Barnacle Goose: Branta leucopsis (Bernache nonnette) 
  4. Cackling Goose: Branta hutchinsii (Bernache de Hutchins) 
  5. Common Shelduck: Tadorna tadorna (Tadorne de Belon)
  6. Wild Turkey: Meleagris gallopavo (Dindon sauvage)
  7. American Flamingo: Phoenicopterus ruber (Flamant des Caraïbes)
  8. Eurasian Collared-Dove: Streptopelia decaocto (Tourterelle turque) 
  9. Ancient Murrelet: Synthliboramphus antiquus (Guillemot à cou blanc)
  10. Tufted Puffin: Fratercula cirrhata (Macareux huppé) 
  11. Mew Gull: Larus canus (Goéland cendré)
  12. Common Gull: Larus canus (Goéland cendré)
  13. Short-billed Gull: Larus brachyrhynchus (Goéland à bec court)
  14. Slaty-backed Gull: Larus schistisagus (Goéland à manteau ardoisé)
  15. Bridled Tern: Onychoprion anaethetus (Sterne bridée)
  16. Red-billed Tropicbird: Phaethon aethereus (Phaéton à bec rouge) 
  17. Cory's Shearwater: Calonectris diomedea (Puffin cendré) 
  18. Audubon’s Shearwater: Puffinus lherminieri (Puffin d'Audubon)
  19. Magnificent Frigatebird: Fregata magnificens (Frégate superbe) 
  20. Brown Booby: Sula leucogaster (Fou brun) 
  21. Roseate Spoonbill: Platalea ajaja (Spatule rosée)
  22. Swallow-tailed Kite: Elanoides forficatus (Naucler à queue fourchue) 
  23. Steller’s Sea-Eagle: Haliaeetus pelagicus (Pygargue empereur)
  24. Crested Caracara: Caracara plancus (Caracara huppé) 
  25. Tropical Kingbird: Tyrannus melancholicus (Tyran mélancolique)
  26. Gray Kingbird: Tyrannus dominicensis (Tyran gris)
  27. Hammond’s Flycatcher: Empidonax hammondii (Moucherolle de Hammond)
  28. Stonechat: (Tarier pâtre)
  29. Asian (Siberian) Stonechat: Saxicola maurus (Tarier de Sibérie)
  30. Mistle Thrush: Turdus viscivorus (Grive draine)
  31. Eurasian Tree Sparrow: Passer montanus (Moineau friquet)
  32. Black-throated Sparrow: Amphispiza bilineata (Bruant à gorge noire)
  33. Brewer’s Sparrow: Spizella breweri (Bruant de Brewer)
  34. Virginia’s Warbler: Leiothlypis virginiae (Paruline de Virginia)
  35. MacGillivray’s Warbler: Geothlypis tolmiei (Paruline des buissons)
  36. Townsend's Warbler: Setophaga townsendi (Paruline de Townsend) 
  37. Lazuli Bunting: Passerina amoena (Passerin azuré)

Graylag Goose: Anser anser (Oie cendrée)

Accidental.

A Graylag Goose was observed and photographed with a small flock of Canada Geese at Saint’s Rest Marsh in Saint John on 30 November, 2007. Four days later on 4 December a Graylag Goose, almost certainly the same individual, was legally shot at Castalia Marsh on Grand Manan. It represents the first specimen for North America for this Eurasian species and the first known to reach the continental mainland. The goose was donated to the New Brunswick Museum and eventual analysis of stable isotopes of hydrogen in the specimen’s feathers and a toenail indicates beyond a reasonable doubt that this Graylag Goose moulted the previous summer in Greenland and its subsequent migratory path was from Greenland to Northern Canada and ultimately, to New Brunswick. Details of the analysis are published in Waterbirds 43, 106-111 and North American Birds Vol. 71 Number 2, 38-41.

Pink-footed Goose: Anser brachyrhynchus (Oie à bec court)

Rare.

The Province’s first Pink-footed Goose was identified with Canada Geese at Cormierville on 30 October, 2010. It remained in the area until 28 November. Another was with Canada Geese at Fredericton from 11–30 November, 2016 and at least three reached New Brunswick in 2019. One was at Nashwaak Village on 24 October, 2019, it or another was at Newcastle Creek from 8 November to early December, and two others appeared at Cap-Bateau on the Acadian Peninsula on 13 November and remained well into December. A few other Pink-footed Geese, at least one in spring, have been recorded. The recent increase in reports of other European waterfowl in eastern North America suggests weather conditions and changes in migratory patterns may favour arrival of migrants from increasing breeding populations in Greenland or Iceland. 

Barnacle Goose: Branta leucopsis (Bernache nonnette) 

Accidental.

An immature bird associating with migrant Canada Geese at Coverdale, Albert Co., 3-29 November, 2001 was added to the provincial list in the category “natural occurrence questionable, but a reasonable possibility”. Subsequent accepted records include another at Coverdale 4 November to early December, 2005, two birds at Miramichi 13 to late-December, 2011 and another at Maugerville 26-29 October, 2019. The Barnacle Goose is another European species that likely reaches eastern North America from Greenland or Iceland.

Cackling Goose: Branta hutchinsii (Bernache de Hutchins) 

Rare.

In the 45th Supplement to its Check-list of North American Birds, the American Ornithologists Union (AOU) recognized the small tundra-breeding races of Canada Geese in North America as a separate species under the name Cackling Goose. The NBBRC has accepted three observations: one at Harvey, Albert Co., on 24 March, 1982, another at Pokemouche, Gloucester Co., from 4 October into November, 2005 and two at St. Marie-de-Kent from late October to late November, 2013. Subsequent reports were not reviewed by the NBBRC.

Common Shelduck: Tadorna tadorna (Tadorne de Belon)

Accidental.

During a Christmas Bird Count on 17 December, 2016 three Common Shelducks were discovered feeding with American Black Ducks at Saint’s Rest Marsh in Saint John. The birds, whose normal range is northern Europe with a relatively new population in Iceland, remained in the area for three weeks and attracted birders from many parts of North America. This represents one of the first records of presumed wild Common Shelducks reaching North America.

Wild Turkey: Meleagris gallopavo (Dindon sauvage)

Breeding.

During the late 1990s scattered reports of Wild Turkeys began in western New Brunswick, despite no earlier history of their presence in the province. By the early 2000s there were reports of hen turkeys with poults and turkey flocks became more numerous. Most turkey presence appeared to be in counties bordering Maine and numbers were more concentrated close to the border. In 2017 the NB Bird Records Committee began a study of New Brunswick turkeys to determine if our birds might have moved in from Maine and be capable of long-term survival in the wild. The study concluded the turkeys indeed came from the State of Maine, where a wild population is firmly established. In 2019 the Committee voted to classify turkeys living in agricultural and residential areas near the Maine border as Wild Turkeys. Turkeys found some distance from the border area should not be considered as wild at this time due to the possibility of having been raised in captivity.

American Flamingo: Phoenicopterus ruber (Flamant des Caraïbes)

REMOVED

Greater Flamingo was removed from the NB Bird List after a vote by members of the NBBRC, taken in 2019. Examination of photographs from 1971 led to the conclusion that the bird that appeared in Dorchester was a Chilean Flamingo, a species regularly kept in zoos, with wild birds not known to wander significant distances.

Eurasian Collared-Dove: Streptopelia decaocto (Tourterelle turque) 

Accidental.

One of this introduced species frequented bird feeders at Harvey Bank, Albert County, from 15 November, 2008 until 23 April, 2009, the first provincial record. A second appeared on Lameque Island on 23 June, 2010 and eventually moved to Miscou Island where it remained until 31 July. A third Eurasian Collared-Dove visited a bird feeder at St. Leonard for a single day on 14 August, 2021. The Eurasian Collared-Dove has been strongly dispersive throughout Europe and Asia and in 1974 a small number escaped from captivity in the Bahamas. Some of those eventually reached Florida and by the early 2000s Eurasian Collared-Doves began to appear in southern Canada. The species is now found in nearly every state in the U.S.

Ancient Murrelet: Synthliboramphus antiquus (Guillemot à cou blanc)

Accidental.

On 27 May, 2016 an Ancient Murrelet was photographed in waters near Machias Seal Island for a first NB record. What is assumed to be the same murrelet had been observed off the coast of Maine on 21 May and on several later dates before it appeared in New Brunswick. A year later on 21 May, 2017 the murrelet was again in the same area near Machias Seal Island. The Ancient Murrelet is a seabird of the North Pacific that breeds in the Aleutians and on other Alaskan islands. It ranges south to central California in winter and is not expected on the East Coast.

Tufted Puffin: Fratercula cirrhata (Macareux huppé) 

Accidental.

Far from its Pacific home, an adult Tufted Puffin was seen and photographed by numerous observers on and around Machias Seal Island from at least 17 June to 14 July, 2014. On 1 July, 2022 an adult Tufted Puffin, assumed to be the same bird, was again spotted on Machias Seal Island and remained in that area until at least 26 July. The bird returned during the first week of May 2023 and for two days consorted with other alcids just offshore.

Mew Gull: Larus canus (Goéland cendré)

REMOVED

In 2021 the American Ornithological Society (AOS) voted to rename Mew Gull and to split the former species into two full species – Common Gull (L. canus) and Short-billed Gull (L. brachyrhynchus).

Common Gull: Larus canus (Goéland cendré)

Rare.

A Common Gull was discovered and photographed with other gulls at the wastewater lagoons in west Saint John on 2 April, 1994. It was present until at least 22 April. Over the next four winters a Common Gull, presumed the same bird, was seen frequently at that site. Other reports of probable Common Gulls have come from Grand Manan, Pocologan, St. Andrews, Sackville, Tracadie and Dalhousie. The Common Gull is a Eurasian gull that appears as a scarce winter visitor in Eastern Canada and the Northeast US. It was formerly considered conspecific with Short-billed Gull until deemed a separate species by the AOS in 2021. The NBBRC has not considered the latter records of L.c.canus since the AOS split.

Short-billed Gull: Larus brachyrhynchus (Goéland à bec court)

Accidental.

New Brunswick’s only confirmed record of Short-billed Gull is a specimen present at Sheffield 4-5 May, 1969 and collected on the second day. It was identified at the time as L. brachyrhynchus at the National Museum in Ottawa. The specimen, now at the New Brunswick Museum, was recently examined by the NBBRC and the species identity confirmed. A sight record of a possible second Short-billed Gull later on 5 May, 1969 cannot be confirmed as that species. All other N.B. “Mew” Gull reports are assigned to Common Gull, L. canus. Short-billed was formerly considered conspecific with Common Gull until deemed a separate species by the AOS in 2021. Short-billed Gull is a bird of northwest North America, distributed from Alaska east to northwest Manitoba and south to southern British Columbia. Most winter near the coast from Alaska to California.

Slaty-backed Gull: Larus schistisagus (Goéland à manteau ardoisé)

Accidental.

On 30 December, 2021 a third-year Slaty-backed Gull was identified at Saint John’s Crane Mountain Landfill. Diagnostic photos were taken and the bird made intermittent visits until at least 24 February, 2022. The Slaty-backed is a Siberian gull that strays occasionally to the West Coast of North America and much more rarely to locations on the East Coast.

Bridled Tern: Onychoprion anaethetus (Sterne bridée)

Accidental.

On 6 July, 2017 a Bridled Tern flew over Machias Seal Island to the consternation of the resident nesting terns and was photographed to document a first occurrence of the species here. The bird did not linger and was seen only briefly by the lighthouse keeper and seabird researchers stationed on the Island. The Bridled Tern is a large dark-backed southern tern normally found in warm tropical waters including the Gulf Stream.

Red-billed Tropicbird: Phaethon aethereus (Phaéton à bec rouge) 

Accidental.

A surprising Red-billed Tropicbird was seen and photographed by several observers at Machias Seal Island on 11 July, 2005. What is generally considered the same seabird was discovered later in July at Seal Island off the coast of Maine where it has returned to spend each summer since that time. Red-billed Tropicbirds forage in tropical waters of the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans and the continued return of this seabird each summer to a location so far from its normal breeding region is extraordinary.

Cory’s Shearwater: Calonectris diomedea (Puffin cendré) 

Rare.

The Province’s first accepted photo-documented observation was of the expected borealis subspecies at “The Prong,” in the Bay of Fundy southeast of Grand Manan on 30 June, 2010. Another, possibly the same individual, was photographed at Machias Seal Island the following day. Since then borealis Cory’s Shearwaters have been reported almost annually by pelagic birders in waters off Grand Manan with most reports during early summer. On 4 July, 2015 a Cory’s Shearwater of the diomedea subspecies which breeds on islands in the Mediterranean Basin rather than in the eastern North Atlantic Ocean, was observed and well photographed. Diomedea birds are now considered a full species, “Scopoli’s Shearwater” in much of the world and could be recognized as such by the AOS in the future.

Audubon’s Shearwater: Puffinus lherminieri (Puffin d’Audubon)

Accidental.

On 11 August, 2016 a small shearwater flew past a whale-watching boat in waters off Grand Manan and was photographed. Viewers felt the bird was different than the similar and expected Manx Shearwater and the New Brunswick Bird Records Committee voted to agree, confirming it as a first record for the province and quite possibly for the Bay of Fundy. Audubon’s Shearwater is a southern seabird frequently found in the warm waters of the Gulf Stream.

Magnificent Frigatebird: Fregata magnificens (Frégate superbe) 

Accidental.

New Brunswick’s first Magnificent Frigatebird was seen flying above the Bay of Fundy east of Grand Manan on 29 August, 2006 by two experienced observers. Although no photographs were taken, their detailed descriptions left no doubt about the identity of this very distinctive southern seabird. On 23 September, 2022 as Hurricane Fiona approached the Maritimes a juvenile Magnificent Frigatebird landed on a Coast Guard research vessel off the coast of the Gaspe Peninsula and remained with the ship until it reached New Brunswick waters near Miscou Island. Many photos were taken before it departed. The Magnificent Frigatebird forages in tropical and subtropical seas between Florida and southern Brazil on the Atlantic seaboard and also along southern Pacific coastlines.

Brown Booby: Sula leucogaster (Fou brun) 

Accidental.

An immature Brown Booby rested on a lobster boat off Grand Manan on 20 May, 2012 and was photographed for a provincial first record. Another Brown Booby in flight was well-described by two experienced seabird observers east of White Head Island on 8 August, 2013. On the evening of 23 July, 2020 a third Brown Booby entered New Brunswick waters perched on the bow of a fishing vessel bound from Maine to Black’s Harbour and remained on board until the ship arrived at its destination. The Brown Booby is an inhabitant of tropical seas around the world and occurs in the Atlantic region from southern Florida to northern South America, including waters around the Caribbean islands. In recent decades there has been an increase in spring-summer Brown Booby sightings as far north as Atlantic Canada.

Roseate Spoonbill: Platalea ajaja (Spatule rosée)

Accidental.

On 14 June, 2020 a long-legged pink bird was observed flying low near the Town of Sussex. Soon afterward it was photographed as it stood in a nearby parking lot. The photos confirmed New Brunswick’s first Roseate Spoonbill, a first-summer individual. A week later, on 20 June the bird’s remains were discovered and salvaged from a hayfield approximately three kilometers from the observation location and added to the Natural History collection of the New Brunswick Museum. Roseate Spoonbills are found from south Florida through coastal Mexico and Central America, the islands of the Caribbean and in much of South America.

Swallow-tailed Kite: Elanoides forficatus (Naucler à queue fourchue) 

Accidental.

Two Swallow-tailed Kites were seen together and photographed separately as they flew through the Hammond River area of Quispamsis on 4 June, 2011. One or two other reports by single observers have been without photographs. The distinctive Swallow-tailed Kite is a migratory raptor, found in summer in the US from North Carolina to east Texas, Mexico and Central America but moving to South America for the winter months to join a year-round population present there as far as southern Brazil. 

Steller’s Sea-Eagle: Haliaeetus pelagicus (Pygargue empereur)

Accidental.

On 28 June, 2021 an adult Steller’s Sea-Eagle was photographed near the mouth of the Restigouche River near Campbellton and remained in that area until at least 1 July. Subsequently seen on the Gaspe Peninsula, it returned to New Brunswick’s Restigouche briefly in late July, then moved on to Nova Scotia, Massachusetts, Maine, Nova Scotia again, and Newfoundland by the summer of 2022. On 25 November, 2022 the famous eagle was photographed at Cormierville NB and enjoyed by scores of birders during the following two days. Steller’s Sea-Eagles live along remote coastlines of northeastern Russia during much of the year with some migrating to northern Japan during winter. Stray birds have wandered to Alaska occasionally and once to British Columbia. Prior to New Brunswick’s 2021 record there were no sightings for Eastern North America.

Crested Caracara: Caracara plancus (Caracara huppé) 

Accidental.

The first for the Province, a sub-adult, was seen and photographed in Gloucester County, at Maltampec on 23 October and again at Rivière-à-la-Truite 25-29 October, 2002. Another appeared at Miramichi from 19-21 April, 2014. A third was at Grand Anse on 3-4 June, 2015 and it or another was photographed near the Shepody River at Harvey Bank on 8 June, 2015. In 2017 a Crested Caracara was seen near St. George from late June to early July and it or another spent from 10 September to 1 November in the area between Hopewell Hill and Sackville. This widespread scavenger falcon is normally found from the southern US south to the very tip of South America.

Tropical Kingbird: Tyrannus melancholicus (Tyran mélancolique)

Accidental.

Birders observed and photographed a Tropical Kingbird at Tabusintac on 17 October, 2015. It was still present the following morning but soon disappeared. On 4 November, 2017 another Tropical Kingbird was photographed at Lameque on the Acadian Peninsula but also disappeared soon after. On 9 November it or another Tropical Kingbird was photo-documented at Cape Tormentine. On 27 October, 2019 yet another Tropical Kingbird was at Cambridge-Narrows and remained in that area until 3 November. Tropical Kingbird is a widespread flycatcher from southern Arizona south through Mexico, Central America and South America as far as central Argentina and western Peru.

Gray Kingbird: Tyrannus dominicensis (Tyran gris)

Accidental.

On 2 October, 2018 a Gray Kingbird was fly-catching on a property at Wilmot, Carleton County, providing a first record for NB. The kingbird was seen by many until 11 October. Gray Kingbird is a southern flycatcher found in North America from Florida to the southern Carolinas and west to southern Alabama and Mississippi in summer. Those birds retreat to islands in the Caribbean and to coastal regions of northern South America for the rest of the year.

Hammond’s Flycatcher: Empidonax hammondii (Moucherolle de Hammond)

Accidental.

On 12 November, 2016 a small Empidonax flycatcher was discovered foraging on a sunny hillside in Fundy National Park. The bird was closely studied and photographs confirmed it was a Hammond’s Flycatcher, a first for New Brunswick. The bird was seen by several birders the following morning. Hammond’s Flycatcher ranges from British Columbia north to the Yukon and Alaska during the summer months and strays only occasionally to the East Coast.

Stonechat: (Tarier pâtre)

RENAMED AND RECLASSIFIED

In 2022 the AOS voted to recognize, with other taxonomies, Common Stonechat as representing three distinct species, Asian Stonechat (Saxicola maurus), African Stonechat (Saxicola torquatus), and European Stonechat (Saxicola rubicola). New Brunswick’s 1983 stonechat was identified as one of two Siberian races, maura or stejnegeri and is now Asian (Siberian) Stonechat, (Saxicola maurus). 

Asian (Siberian) Stonechat: Saxicola maurus (Tarier de Sibérie)

Accidental.

One was photographed at Castalia Marsh on 1 October 1983, providing the first confirmed record for North America. The photos allowed experts to determine it was a Siberian subspecies which, in 2022 was recognized by the AOS as one of three distinct stonechat species, Asian (Siberian) Stonechat. Asian (Siberian) Stonechat breeds from Siberia south to the Himalaya and southwest China and west to eastern Turkey and the Caspian Sea as well as the far northeast of Europe. It is the only stonechat species identified to date in North America, with at least five records subsequent to 1983, four in Alaska and one in California.

Mistle Thrush: Turdus viscivorus (Grive draine)

Accidental.

On 9 December, 2017 a Mistle Thrush was discovered feeding on berries at a property in Miramichi, the first Mistle Thrush ever seen in North America. The bird remained in the area until the latter part of March, 2018 and attracted hundreds of birders from across Canada and the US. After acceptance as a probable natural stray by the NB Bird Records Committee the species was added to the North American Checklist by the AOS in 2019. Mistle Thrush is a large, pale and long-tailed thrush with a huge range throughout Europe, western Asia and Northern Africa. It’s a year-round resident in much of its range but northern populations migrate southward in autumn.

Eurasian Tree Sparrow: Passer montanus (Moineau friquet)

Accidental.

On 15 May, 2021 a Eurasian Tree Sparrow was seen on White Head Island and what was likely the same bird was photographed at North Head, Grand Manan the following morning. The Eurasian Tree Sparrow has an extensive distribution across its native Europe and Asia. In 1870 a few were transported from Germany and introduced to North America at St. Louis, Missouri. Those sparrows eventually spread from Missouri to parts of Illinois and Iowa where a limited wild population still exists. Whether this Eurasian Tree Sparrow reached New Brunswick from western Europe or came eastward from the Missouri region cannot be known but it is New Brunswick’s only record.

Black-throated Sparrow: Amphispiza bilineata (Bruant à gorge noire)

Accidental.

On the evening of 25 April, 2016 a Black-throated Sparrow was discovered with other common sparrows on the grounds of the Beaubassin Research Station in Aulac, near the border with Nova Scotia. The sparrow remained nearly a week, affording birders from around the province good looks at this first NB record. Coincidently, a Black-throated Sparrow spent the previous winter in southern Maine and disappeared before the sparrow appeared in Aulac. The Black-throated Sparrow is a beautiful native of the deserts of the southwest US and parts of Mexico.

Brewer’s Sparrow: Spizella breweri (Bruant de Brewer)

Accidental.

A small sparrow appeared at a Quispamsis feeder on 23 January, 2023. Initially thought to be a Clay-colored (Spizella pallida), it was subsequently identified as the similar Brewer’s Sparrow, a first provincial record. The bird was studied by naturalists from across New Brunswick and well documented by photographs. It remained at the property until at least 2 May. Brewer’s is a western sparrow, the species consisting of two subspecies. Those found in the western and southwestern US are largely the nominate S. breweri, while larger and darker birds breeding at altitude in Alaska, British Columbia and southwest Alberta are of the subspecies S.taverneri, known as “Timberline” Sparrow. This Brewer’s Sparrow has not yet been identified to subspecies.

Virginia’s Warbler: Leiothlypis virginiae (Paruline de Virginia)

Accidental.

On 9 January, 2016 a Northern Shrike captured a small songbird at the Wilson Marsh in Moncton. An observer approached the shrike and took a series of photographs of the shrike and its fresh-caught meal. The photos clearly show the prey to be a Virginia’s Warbler, the first to be documented in the Province. Unfortunately the identification was made later from the photos so the remains were not salvaged to add to the documentation. Virginia’s is a southwestern warbler normally found from southwest Texas to Arizona and Nevada in spring and summer and in Mexico and beyond during winter. 

MacGillivray’s Warbler: Geothlypis tolmiei (Paruline des buissons)

Accidental.

On 1 November, 2009 an unfamiliar warbler was photographed at Red Point, on Grand Manan. Although seen only briefly, the bird was later identified from the photographs as New Brunswick’s first MacGillivray’s Warbler. MacGillivray’s range is from western Alberta and British Columbia south to California and Arizona in summer, and Mexico and Central America in winter.

Townsend’s Warbler: Setophaga townsendi (Paruline de Townsend) 

Accidental.

In the autumn of 2005, two of these western warblers appeared in the province and were seen and photographed by numerous observers. The first was on wooded slopes near the swimming pool in Fundy National Park 4-11 November, and the other appeared at a bird feeder in Quispamsis, from 27 November to 11 December. The only other documented record is a male at Waterside from 12-14 May, 2020. The species is found in summer from Alaska and the Yukon south through British Columbia and south-western Alberta to northern California and winters in Mexico and parts of Central America.

Lazuli Bunting: Passerina amoena (Passerin azuré)

Accidental.

An unfamiliar finch appeared at a Tide Head feeder on 11 May, 2016. It proved to be a first-spring male Lazuli Bunting, the western counterpart of the Indigo Bunting of the East. Several observers were able to view it and take photographs before the end of the day but the bunting was not seen again. Lazuli Bunting is an extreme rarity anywhere in the eastern half of North America as its regular summer range is from southern Saskatchewan west to British Columbia and south to California and northern New Mexico.

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