Programs

//Programs
Programs 2018-07-30T15:58:54+00:00

Below is a list of all the educational programs we offer, along with brief descriptions. Feel free to contact us if you have any questions or would like to book a particular program.

Bird Silhouettes: Students will learn how to use binoculars, then learn how to identify birds based on their size and shape. If time allows, we can do a bird observation walk to count and identify birds in the schoolyard or neighbourhood.

Birdwatching: Students will learn why birds are important and how to identify common birds using their eyes and ears. Students will learn how to use binoculars and will do a bird observation walk to count and identify birds in the schoolyard or neighbourhood.

Bird Count (Citizen Science): Students will learn how to use binoculars, take a walk around the schoolyard to identify birds, and use the data they collect to make a graph of their observations.

FeederWatch (Citizen Science): Students will hang a bird feeder in the schoolyard, then observe the birds that visit the feeder through the year. Data is shared with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

Migration: Students will play an active game to learn about bird migration and the importance of habitat.

Owls: Students will learn about an owl’s special adaptations and will work in groups to dissect an owl pellet

Species at Risk: Students will learn about species at risk in New Brunswick and how they are placed on the species at risk list. Students will play a game about the endangered Piping Plover to learn why it is at risk, current conservation efforts, and what we can do to help!

Bats: Students will learn all about bats in New Brunswick by dressing as a bat, comparing bats to another flying animal (birds), and playing an echolocation game.

Tracks, Scat, and Skulls: Students will learn about different New Brunswick mammals by acting as detectives in a murder-mystery game, where clues are the tracks and scat that animals leave behind. If time allows, we will go on a walk to look for real tracks, scat, and other clues that animals leave behind.

Critter Dipping: Students will visit a wetland and use nets to catch invertebrates, tadpoles, frogs, and salamanders. Students will learn about invertebrates, amphibians, and wetlands, and why they are important.

Insects/Invertebrates: Students will learn the important ecological role insects and invertebrates play in our world. Students will go on an “insect safari” where they will catch and release insects and learn how to identify common species.

Monarchs: Students will play an active game that simulates Monarch butterfly migration, and will learn about the needs and challenges of butterflies as they migrate.

Plants/Trees: Students will learn the different parts of the plant, why plants are important, and will learn how to identify common plants and trees.

Food Webs: Students will play a tag game where they take on the roles of producer, herbivore, carnivore, and decomposer to simulate the food chain.

Wetlands: Students will learn what defines a wetland, the different functions of a wetland, and will play an active game about the importance of wetlands.

Bird Count: Students will learn how to use binoculars, take a walk around the schoolyard to identify birds, and use the data they collect to make a graph of their observations.

FeederWatch: Students will hang a bird feeder in the schoolyard, then observe the birds that visit the feeder through the year. Data is shared with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

FrogWatch: Students will look and listen for frogs in the spring. Data is shared through the NatureWatch network.

IceWatch: Students will watch bodies of water near the school and record information about ice freezing and melting. Data is shared through the NatureWatch network.

PlantWatch: Students will choose a plant in the schoolyard and watch it in the spring to record its blooming date. Data is shared through the NatureWatch network.

Season Spotter: Students will observe their schoolyard throughout the year to learn about seasonal changes.

Track Trapper: Students will create a mud trap in the schoolyard to be left overnight, and will return the next morning to see what animals left their tracks in the mud. Students will learn about animal identification and the importance of habitat.

WormWatch: Students will find and record worms in the schoolyard. Data is shared through the NatureWatch network.

Yardmap: Students will explore and draw a map of the schoolyard, learning which features are important for birds and how birds can use the habitat in the schoolyard. Data can be shared with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

Astronomy: Students will learn how to identify common constellations and the mythologies behind them through storytelling and a game. If time allows, students will make a Planisphere (or “Star Wheel”) so they can search the night sky for constellations.

Critter Dipping: Students will visit a wetland and use nets to catch invertebrates, tadpoles, frogs, and salamanders. Students will learn about invertebrates, amphibians, and wetlands, and why they are important.

Frogs: Students will learn about frog communication, frog life cycles, and the challenges frogs face in day-to-day life.

Mushrooms: Students will learn what how mushrooms are classified alongside other living things, how to identify different types of wild mushrooms, and why mushrooms are so important to our environment.

Species at Risk: Students will learn about species at risk in New Brunswick and how they are placed on the species at risk list. Students will play a game about the endangered Piping Plover to learn why it is at risk, current conservation efforts, and what we can do to help!

We can modify any of our programs to suit this age group. Please see our full list of programs in the “By Subject” tab.

We can modify any of our programs to suit this age group. Please see our full list of programs in the “By Subject” tab.

Shorebird Migration: Students will play an active game to learn about bird migration and the importance of habitat

Bird Silhouettes: Students will learn how to use binoculars, then learn how to identify birds based on their size and shape. If time allows, we can do a bird observation walk to count and identify birds in the schoolyard or neighbourhood.

Season Spotter (Citizen Science): Students will observe their schoolyard throughout the year to learn about seasonal changes

Wetland Values: Students will learn what defines a wetland, the different functions of a wetland, and will play an active game about the importance of wetlands

Critter Dipping: Students will visit a wetland and use nets to catch invertebrates, tadpoles, frogs, and salamanders. Students will learn about wetlands and invertebrates and why they are important.

Frog Fortunes: Students will learn about frog communication, frog life cycles, and the challenges frogs face in day-to-day life

Insect Safari: Students will learn how to identify insects, why they are important, and how to handle them with care. Students will catch and release insects in their schoolyard and try to identify them.

Going Batty: Students will learn all about bats in New Brunswick by dressing as a bat, comparing bats to another flying animal (birds), and playing an echolocation game

Meet a Tree: Students will learn about the structures of a tree and their functions, as well as why trees are so important for our ecosystems. If time allows, students will find trees in their schoolyard and learn how to identify them.

Critter Dipping: Students will visit a wetland and use nets to catch invertebrates, tadpoles, frogs, and salamanders. Students will learn about wetlands and invertebrates and why they are important.

Frog Fortunes: Students will learn about frog communication, frog life cycles, and the challenges frogs face in day-to-day life

Monarchs Gotta Go: Students will play an active game that simulates Monarch butterfly migration, and will learn about the needs and challenges of butterflies as they migrate

Schoolyard Bird Count: Students will learn how to use binoculars, take a walk around the schoolyard to identify birds, and use the data they collect to make a graph of their observations.

FeederWatch: Students will hang a bird feeder in the schoolyard, then observe the birds that visit the feeder through the year. Data is shared with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

FrogWatch: Students will listen for frog calls in the spring.

IceWatch: Students will watch bodies of water near the school and record information about ice freezing and melting

PlantWatch: Students will choose a plant in the schoolyard and watch it in the spring to record its blooming date

Season Spotter: Students will observe their schoolyard throughout the year to learn about seasonal changes

Track Trapper: Students will create a mud trap in the schoolyard to be left overnight, and will return the next morning to see what animals left their tracks in the mud. Students will learn about animal identification and the importance of habitat.

Worm Watch: Students will find and record worms in the schoolyard.

Yard Map: Students will explore and draw a map of the schoolyard, learning which features are important for birds and how birds can use the habitat in the schoolyard. Data can be shared with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology

Budding Botanists: Students will learn why plants are important, and will “build a plant” to learn plant structures and their functions

Meet a Tree: Students will learn about the structures of a tree and their functions, as well as why trees are so important for our ecosystems. If time allows, students will find trees in their schoolyard and learn how to identify them.

Tree Bingo: Students will learn about the structures of a tree and their functions, as well as why trees are so important for our ecosystems. Students will learn to identify common native trees.

Shorebird Migration: Students will play an active game to learn about bird migration and the importance of habitat

Bird Silhouettes: Students will learn how to use binoculars, then learn how to identify birds based on their size and shape. If time allows, we can do a bird observation walk to count and identify birds in the schoolyard or neighbourhood.

Owl Pellets: Students will learn about an owl’s special adaptations and will work in groups to dissect an owl pellet

Schoolyard Bird Count: Students will learn how to use binoculars, take a walk around the schoolyard to identify birds, and use the data they collect to make a graph of their observations.

FeederWatch: Students will hang a bird feeder in the schoolyard, then observe the birds that visit the feeder through the year. Data is shared with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

FrogWatch: Students will listen for frog calls in the spring.

IceWatch: Students will watch bodies of water near the school and record information about ice freezing and melting

PlantWatch: Students will choose a plant in the schoolyard and watch it in the spring to record its blooming date

Season Spotter: Students will observe their schoolyard throughout the year to learn about seasonal changes

Track Trapper: Students will create a mud trap in the schoolyard to be left overnight, and will return the next morning to see what animamls left their tracks in the mud. Students will learn about animal identification and the importance of habitat.

WormWatch: Students will find and record worms in the schoolyard.

Yard Map: Students will explore and draw a map of the schoolyard, learning which features are important for birds and how birds can use the habitat in the schoolyard. Data can be shared with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology

Wetland Values: Students will learn what defines a wetland, the different functions of a wetland, and will play an active game about the importance of wetlands

Animal Game: Students will play a tag game where students take on the roles of producer, herbivore, carnivore, and decomposer to simulate the food chain.

Critter Dipping: Students will visit a wetland and use nets to catch invertebrates, tadpoles, frogs, and salamanders. Students will learn about wetlands and invertebrates and why they are important.

Frog Fortunes: Students will learn about frog communication, frog life cycles, and the challenges frogs face in day-to-day life

Insect Safari: Students will learn how to identify insects, why they are important, and how to handle them with care. Students will catch and release insects in their schoolyard and try to identify them.

Monarchs Gotta Go: Students will play an active game that simulates Monarch butterfly migration, and will learn about the needs and challenges of butterflies as they migrate

Going Batty: Students will learn all about bats in New Brunswick by dressing as a bat, comparing bats to another flying animal (birds), and playing an echolocation game

Tracks, Scat, and Skulls: Students will learn about different New Brunswick mammals by acting as detectives in a murder-mystery game, where clues are the tracks and scat that animals leave behind.

Budding Botanists: Students will learn key plant structures, how plants are adapted to their habitats, and will design their own plants to survive in a specific habitat

Tree Bingo: Students will learn about the structures of a tree and their functions, as well as why trees are so important for our ecosystems. Students will learn to identify common native trees.

Species at Risk: Students will learn about species at risk in New Brunswick and how they are placed on the species at risk list. Students will play a game about the endangered Piping Plover to learn why it is at risk, current conservation efforts, and what we can do to help.

Schoolyard Bird Count: Students will learn how to use binoculars, take a walk around the schoolyard to identify birds, and use the data they collect to make a graph of their observations.

FeederWatch: Students will hang a bird feeder in the schoolyard, then observe the birds that visit the feeder through the year. Data is shared with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

FrogWatch: Students will listen for frog calls in the spring.

IceWatch: Students will watch bodies of water near the school and record information about ice freezing and melting

PlantWatch: Students will choose a plant in the schoolyard and watch it in the spring to record its blooming date

Season Spotter: Students will observe their schoolyard throughout the year to learn about seasonal changes

Track Trapper: Students will create a mud trap in the schoolyard to be left overnight, and will return the next morning to see what animamls left their tracks in the mud. Students will learn about animal identification and the importance of habitat.

WormWatch: Students will find and record worms in the schoolyard.

Yard Map: Students will explore and draw a map of the schoolyard, learning which features are important for birds and how birds can use the habitat in the schoolyard. Data can be shared with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology

Owl Pellets: Students will learn about an owl’s special adaptations and will work in groups to dissect an owl pellet

Schoolyard Bird Count: Students will learn how to use binoculars, take a walk around the schoolyard to identify birds, and use the data they collect to make a graph of their observations.

FeederWatch: Students will hang a bird feeder in the schoolyard, then observe the birds that visit the feeder through the year. Data is shared with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

FrogWatch: Students will listen for frog calls in the spring.

IceWatch: Students will watch bodies of water near the school and record information about ice freezing and melting

PlantWatch: Students will choose a plant in the schoolyard and watch it in the spring to record its blooming date

Season Spotter: Students will observe their schoolyard throughout the year to learn about seasonal changes

Track Trapper: Students will create a mud trap in the schoolyard to be left overnight, and will return the next morning to see what animamls left their tracks in the mud. Students will learn about animal identification and the importance of habitat.

Worm Watch: Students will find and record worms in the schoolyard.

Critter Dipping: Students will visit a wetland and use nets to catch invertebrates, tadpoles, frogs, and salamanders. Students will learn about wetlands and invertebrates and why they are important.

Frog Fortunes: Students will learn about frog communication, frog life cycles, and the challenges frogs face in day-to-day life

Insect Safari: Students will learn how to identify insects, why they are important, and how to handle them with care. Students will catch and release insects in their schoolyard and try to identify them.

Going Batty: Students will learn all about bats in New Brunswick by dressing as a bat, comparing bats to another flying animal (birds), and playing an echolocation game

Tracks, Scat, and Skulls: Students will learn about different New Brunswick mammals by acting as detectives in a murder-mystery game, where clues are the tracks and scat that animals leave behind.

Owl Pellets: Students will learn about an owl’s special adaptations and will work in groups to dissect an owl pellet

Schoolyard Bird Count: Students will learn how to use binoculars, take a walk around the schoolyard to identify birds, and use the data they collect to make a graph of their observations.

FeederWatch: Students will hang a bird feeder in the schoolyard, then observe the birds that visit the feeder through the year. Data is shared with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

FrogWatch: Students will listen for frog calls in the spring.

IceWatch: Students will watch bodies of water near the school and record information about ice freezing and melting

PlantWatch: Students will choose a plant in the schoolyard and watch it in the spring to record its blooming date

Season Spotter: Students will observe their schoolyard throughout the year to learn about seasonal changes

Track Trapper: Students will create a mud trap in the schoolyard to be left overnight, and will return the next morning to see what animamls left their tracks in the mud. Students will learn about animal identification and the importance of habitat.

Worm Watch: Students will find and record worms in the schoolyard.

Animal Game: Students will play a tag game where students take on the roles of producer, herbivore, carnivore, and decomposer to simulate the food chain.

Critter Dipping: Students will visit a wetland and use nets to catch invertebrates, tadpoles, frogs, and salamanders. Students will learn about wetlands and invertebrates and why they are important.

Insect Safari: Students will learn how to identify insects, why they are important, and how to handle them with care. Students will catch and release insects in their schoolyard and try to identify them.

Schoolyard Bird Count: Students will learn how to use binoculars, take a walk around the schoolyard to identify birds, and use the data they collect to make a graph of their observations.

FeederWatch: Students will hang a bird feeder in the schoolyard, then observe the birds that visit the feeder through the year. Data is shared with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

FrogWatch: Students will listen for frog calls in the spring.

IceWatch: Students will watch bodies of water near the school and record information about ice freezing and melting

PlantWatch: Students will choose a plant in the schoolyard and watch it in the spring to record its blooming date

Season Spotter: Students will observe their schoolyard throughout the year to learn about seasonal changes

Track Trapper: Students will create a mud trap in the schoolyard to be left overnight, and will return the next morning to see what animamls left their tracks in the mud. Students will learn about animal identification and the importance of habitat.

Worm Watch: Students will find and record worms in the schoolyard.